Woodland enterprise

Raincliffe Wood Community Enterprise was set up back in 2016 to take on the management of Raincliffe, Forge Valley and Row Brow Woods near Scarborough. Their mission is to build a strong community enterprise that secures a safe and sustainable future for the woods while enhancing wildlife and community benefits.

 

They’ve been working ever since to restore these ancient woodlands to predominantly broadleaf with all the biodiversity benefits that brings to this important area. Part of it is a National Nature Reserve and the area also includes the Raincliffe & Forge Valley Woods Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) because of its sequence of woodland types rich with botany, birds and other animals. The historic environment is also full of features related to past industry and endeavour such as charcoal platforms and a forge. The Community/Social Enterprise aspect means income generated through woodland management today is used to help make the ongoing management sustainable and also to provide associated activities such as improving access, increasing community involvement and providing education.

 

Recently the National Park Authority have been working with Raincliffe Wood Community Enterprise (RWCE) and others to carry out works in the woods to get rid of litter, keep access open, and tackle rhododendron. Have a look at the RWCE’s recent Working Together blog post to find out more and to keep up to date about future plans.

Raincliffe Woods - https://www.raincliffewoods.co.uk/

Let out of the Office

Tom Stephenson – External Funding Officer

A week or so ago as part of my induction to the National Park Authority I accompanied Mark the Woodland Officer to plant oak trees at Keldgate on Levisham Estate. Part of the area was PAWS (Plantation on Ancient Woodland Site) and the conifers had previously been harvested. The aim is that the surviving woodland ground flora will spread now that the ground shading conifers have gone and with some tree planting and natural regeneration the site will become a semi natural woodland habitat again.

I made sure I came fully prepared with man-flu, a borrowed jacket (thanks Amy Thomas) and inappropriate trousers – as is to be expected for an office boy let lose in the field. After meeting the Rangers and Apprentices on site, we continued the previous good work of the National Park Volunteers by planting more new trees and so helping restore the wood to how it would have been centuries ago before the recent introduction of non-native conifers. Despite the early efforts of the rain, I had a great day learning about woodland conservation, watching the occasional steam train trundle by and generally putting the world to rights as we dug holes, planted saplings and hammered in stakes.

Keldgate, Levisham Estate

As the new External Funding Officer for the Authority my actual day job is going to be helping to identify and secure external funding to enable our ambitious conservation projects across the National Park…