Going with the flow

Anne-Louise Orange – Ryevitalise Programme Manager

Following the success in securing Heritage Lottery Fund money to support the development of our Ryevitalise programme, the team are now in place and working towards a Stage 2 application*.

The Heritage Lottery Fund’s Landscape Partnerships programme is for schemes led by a partnership of local, regional and national interests which aim to conserve specific areas of distinctive landscape character.

River Rye at Lower Locker, Snilesworth - copyright Liz Bassindale, HH AONB.

The Ryevitalise landscape incorporates the main upper Rye catchment, made up of the upper valleys of the Rye including the River Seph and the River Riccal. The Ryevitalise programme aims to protect and enhance the area’s natural and cultural heritage, resulting in a more natural, better functioning and better understood landscape.

River Rye in Duncombe Park - copyright NYMNPA.

We’ve got a remarkable abundance and variety of priority habitats and wildlife; a number of rare and priority species are strongly linked to the river valleys, including one of only three known UK populations of Alcathoe bat. The catchment is also a national hotspot for veteran trees – iconic and irreplaceable features of both our natural and cultural heritage.

River Rye - crow foot beds in the Vale of Pickering - copyright.

Ryevitalise projects will cover four themes:

  • River Riccal at sunset - copyright Rosy Eaton, Natural England.Water Environment, investigating aquatic habitats of the Rye and rare and threatened species;
  • Water Quality, working with land-owners and managers to reduce pollution;
  • Water Level Management, working alongside our delivery partners to harness natural processes to manage the sources and pathways of flood waters; and
  • Reconnecting People, improving the understanding of the river landscape by telling the story of its evolution and encouraging people to protect their heritage.

The new team – that’s me and Alex Cripps, Catchment Restoration Officer – are keen to hear from anyone with an interest in the Rye catchment. We will be consulting with partners, local landowners and wider communities over the coming months as we develop the projects we want to deliver, ensuring we incorporate peoples’ ideas and knowledge under the four themes. We look forward to meeting with/talking to as many people as we can as we develop our Stage 2 application.

Aerial view of River Rye and Nunnington Hall - taken by NEYEDC.

*The Stage 2 application will be submitted to Heritage Lottery Fund in the autumn of 2018.

Heritage Lottery Fund logo

Catchment Trilogy – Part 2: Discovering the Esk

Alex Cripps – Catchment Partnership Officer

The Yorkshire Esk Rivers Trust (YERT) on behalf of the Esk and Coastal Streams Catchment Partnership* received a funding boost last April thanks to players of a charity lottery. £10,000 was awarded by the People’s Postcode Trust to deliver Discovering the Esk.

The Discovering the Esk project is made up of four initiatives:

  • Salmon in the Classroom;
  • Young Anglers Initiative;
  • Adopt a Stream; and
  • Riverfly Monitoring.

Discovering the Esk brings local people together to care for the catchment environment, and the first year of the project has been a great success!

Salmon in the Classroom literally brings the river into the classroom albeit in a fish tank! Primary School pupils along the Esk Valley learn more about the lifecycle of the Atlantic salmon, river ecology, and the important role they can play in looking after our local rivers into the future.

In 2015 we delivered Salmon in the Classroom at Goathland Primary School and the pupils did a great job caring for the eggs culminating in releasing the young fry back into the Esk in May. This year we will be at Sleights Primary School so it will be the turn of the children there to watch the eggs hatch and the young fry grow until the fish can be released to take their place back amongst the inhabitants of the river.

Through the Young Angler Initiative nine young anglers learnt to fish this year thanks to the dedication of local angling club volunteers (from the Esk Fisheries Association) who ran the fishing sessions. A professional tutor kick started the season with a Taster Day and then returned towards the end of the season to hone our young angler’s growing skills.

As well as the actual fishing our young anglers also got to enjoy the outdoors and to fish at places they had not been to before, and the sessions were an opportunity for to socialise.

Riverfly Monitoring is currently carried out by twenty local volunteers who have now been trained up in the nationally recognised sampling methodology established by the Riverfly Partnership.

The volunteers have learnt how to identify key aquatic invertebrates groups which we know require good clean water to survive. Our current volunteers are now monitoring thirty sites across the catchment to assess the water quality and detect signs of any issues. They do this by taking a 3 minute kick sample (to disturb the river bed and overhanging vegetation) catching the content in a net, and a 1 minute stone search. The sample is then cleaned using river water and put into a tray to settle. Key river invertebrate groups are identified and counted and if the results are lower than expected the Catchment Partnership and Environment Agency  can investigate the area to check for any potential pollution incidents causing the issues.

Our volunteers have been honing their identification skills at refresher workshops, getting to see these beautiful invertebrates up close!

Adopt a Stream is a new initiative recruiting ‘Guardians of the Esk’. We already have a number of people reporting interesting things they see while out and about, but Adopt a Stream ensures that key areas are being checked regularly and that information is collated and applied. Through Adopt a Stream we hope that all the potential barriers to migratory fish sites on the Esk can be adopted, with volunteers ensuring the structures do not become blocked. If they do, the Catchment Partnership can be alerted and can sort them out. We want to make sure the whole catchment is monitored to check for issues such as litter, and to build up a network of people monitoring the local wildlife so we can accrue a picture of what is normal and use it to continually assess the health of the river.

If you might be interested in becoming one of our ‘Guardians of the Esk’ we are holding an Adopt a Stream workshop on Monday 7 March. The monitoring programme is designed to suit everyone’s interests and fit within the time you can commit, so if you have a favourite walk, a regular fishing spot or simply visit the catchment now and again, then we would love for you to get involved. Please contact us.

View of the Esk - copyright Jeff at Aetherweb (aetherweb.co.uk)

View of the Esk. Copyright https://www.flickr.com/people/tall-guy/.

For more information on Discovering the Esk, how you can get involved, and the latest Catchment Partnership news, please have look at the Yorkshire Esk Rivers Trust website.

* The Esk and Coastal Streams Catchment Partnership is jointly hosted by the Yorkshire Esk Rivers Trust and the North York Moors National Park Authority, who work together to improve and care for the Esk and Coastal Streams Catchment.

 

 

Hangover cure

Emily Collins – Conservation Student Intern

The future of Sil Howe, an abandoned mine site above Beck Hole, has changed quite a bit since I first set foot there in early autumn. It was then that we recognised the iron ochre within the mine as being an ongoing potential threat to the surrounding countryside. In the event of high rainfall, this thick orange blanket, which oozes into the watercourse at the slightest disturbance, could potentially form a terracotta cascade potent enough to wipe out whole communities within the surrounding area… Silhowe January 2015 - someone's wellie covered in iron ochre - by Emily Collins

Residents of nearby Darnholm, Goathland and Beck Hole should have no fear though, for I’m talking about a very different type of community to that which might revolve around the local pub. As explained in an earlier post, this iron sediment can smother invertebrate populations in the surrounding watercourses and reduce the amount of food available for important fish populations in the Esk. Even when leaking into the beck at low levels the iron sediment seems to be having an effect, with initial water samples indicating large changes in pH and a loss of aquatic invertebrates close to the entrance of the mine. Now we’re working on a solution.

Silhowe January 2015 - group discussing proposals - by Emily Collins

Earlier this month my colleagues and I were joined by Natural England, the Environment Agency, the University of Hull and the local Head Gamekeeper on site to discuss plans for the installation of a reed bed at the Sil Howe mine entrance. Whilst trying not to become too distracted by the beautiful views and the numbing feeling in our toes, we discussed how the reeds would slow the flow of the water, allowing enough time for the iron to precipitate out of it before it continues downstream.

Silhowe January 2015 - remains of miners' hut - by Emily CollinsOf course, such a venture poses a number of concerns:

Will it be aesthetically pleasing?

Will the bund be large enough to hold the water and where do we get the material from to build it?

Will it have any impact on the neighbouring remains of the historic miners’ hut?

Whilst it meant freezing our appendages off on top of the moor for two hours, resolving these environmental, cultural and local conflicts was vital for strengthening the foundations of the project.

Silhowe January 2015 - mine adit - by Emily Collins

If planning permission is granted the work is due to start around the beginning of February and will last 2-5 days. In the meantime, students at the University of Hull are analysing the invertebrate and water samples we collected from the beck in October and will provide evidence for the detrimental impact that the iron sediment is having on aquatic life in the beck. We will then return to collect more samples once the reed beds have been installed, and again for the following few years to record the changes in water quality over time.

Original plan for remedial wetland creation at Silhowe - subject to change

If this works, we could roll out the same kind of thing elsewhere where the historic environment still impacts on the North York Moors today.