Helping turn plans into profit

Amy Thomas – North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme Manager

North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme logoIt’s great to be able to start a new year with some good news – so we are very pleased to say that the North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme is now open for business again.

LEADER funding is for projects that create jobs and help businesses grow and which therefore benefit the rural economy.

Between now and September 2018 the LEADER Programme in the North York Moors, Coast and Hills area is looking to support applications for projects or activity under the following four priorities:

  1. Farm Productivity;
  2. Micro and Small Business & Farm Diversification;
  3. Rural Tourism; and
  4. Forestry Productivity.

Farm Productivity
As an important and significant economic sector in the wider North York Moors area, the Programme wants to support the agricultural sector to grow and become more profitable. Applications under this priority need to help improve your farms productivity. Examples of potential activities include:

  • The purchase of equipment to improve the efficiency of use of water, energy, fertilizer, and animal feeds such as LED lighting in livestock sheds,
    specialist drills and crop robotics;
  • Support for businesses which process, market or develop agricultural products both on and off farm holdings, for example food and drink businesses and butchery facilities; or
  • Improvements to animal health and welfare for example gait analysis systems, mobile handling systems, and electronic weight systems linked to EID (electronic identification) readers.

Pickering Market Place

Micro and Small Businesses
LEADER wants to help establish, support and grow micro and small businesses in the area. Investments can be made which will help you produce more or something new, or help you access new markets or link up with other businesses in the area. All applications will need to show that the investment will directly result in increased employment opportunities and / or growth of the business. Farm diversification activities are also eligible.

Rural Tourism
Tourism is another key element of our Blue plaque - Brompton, near Scarboroughlocal economy. The LEADER Programme wants to support tourism businesses to improve their offer to visitors, to be more innovative in the use of technology, and to extend the season which will increase footfall and visitor spending in the area. Visitor attractions, facilities, products and services can all be considered. To be successful your application will need to show that jobs will be created and that the economy will benefit as a result of any funding being awarded.

Forestry Productivity
Our fourth priority is forestry. LEADER wants to support forestry contracting businesses or private forestry holdings requiring equipment and machinery to help produce, extract or process both timber and non-timber products. Continuing with the economic theme of the Programme, your application will need to show that LEADER funding will help create employment opportunities, and add value to the timber / forest products, as well as improve woodland management.

Forestry management in the North York Moors. Copyright NYMNPA.Our area has inspiring landscapes, unique attractions, notable assets and resourceful people – LEADER funding can help make more of these benefits. If you have plans for your farm, your business, your community, it would be well worth having a look at what LEADER is offering.

Full details on how to apply, including the Outline Application (and a list of eligible / ineligible equipment), can be found on our website – www.moorscoastandhills.org.uk

Our website also has a lot more information on LEADER, but if you have any questions or queries, or would like to talk through a potential project or application in advance of submitting an Outline Application, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch with me.

Shared learning

Roy McGhie – Conservation Project Assistant

I’ve taken over the role of Conservation Project Assistant from Kirsty who left the National Park Authority earlier this year for pastures new.

Roy McGhie - learning to scythe at Ryedale Folk Museum - copyright Roy Hampson

I have had a fairly diverse career so far. I am a qualified primary teacher, have worked in business and manufacturing, and have spent more time studying than I care to think about! I have always had a passion for the natural environment, and volunteered whenever and wherever I could. A recent move to North Yorkshire enabled me to retrain in this sector, and now I find myself working for the National Park Authority, which is a dream come true. I love being able to meet the people who manage the land in the National Park, helping them to conserve and enhance the North York Moors in a way that is beneficial to both people and the environment. So far I’ve been largely concentrating on turning Traditional Boundary Scheme (TBS) applications into agreements to help restore boundaries that are so important to the landscape character of the North York Moors.

North York Moors National Park landscape - copyright Roy McGhie, NYMNPA

Amidst my TBS efforts, a couple of weeks ago John (Land Management Adviser) and I attended the annual Farm Liaison Officers conference hosted by the South Downs National Park. This event is an opportunity for agri-environment staff from all 15 of the UK’s National Parks to meet and discuss common issues and difficulties that we face, as well as to find areas of best practice which we can take back to our own National Parks. Whilst the job titles differ from Park to Park it was clear that what we all shared was a passion for working with land managers to achieve mutually beneficial conservation goals.

The first full day was filled with site visits – even if the specific habitats and species we saw were sometimes different to those in the North York Moors, the issues around land management and competing pressures are similar to those we face here.

Tom Tupper - South Downs NP, Farm Liaison Officers Meeting 2015 - copyright Roy McGhie, NYMNPAThe first day started with a visit to Bignor Farm near Pulborough. Here, Tom Tupper, a local landowner, introduced us to the chalk grasslands, known as downlands, that make up much of the iconic character of the South Downs. During World War II the South Downs lost about 80% of its grassy downlands, partly to intensive agriculture for food production, and partly to military training. Today, only about 4% of the South Downs remain as chalk downland.

Tom also took us to Bignor Roman Villa, which has been in his family’s stewardship since it was re-discovered over 200 years ago. The site is renowned for having some of the best Roman mosaics in the country, both in terms of detail and preservation. Our stop at the villa allowed us to discuss the intricacies of preserving monuments alongside the public (and often financial) requirement for interpretation and access. There are similar issues at Cawthorn Camps, a Roman site on the North York Moors.

Roman Villa - South Downs NP, Farm Liaison Officers Meeting 2015 - copyright Roy McGhie, NYMNPA

We visited Peppering Farm on the Norfolk Estate. The Estate is currently in a Higher Level Stewardship agri-environment agreement, but carries out more conservation work than it receives money towards, for instance in regards to reversing the decline of the Grey Partridge. This highlighted the ongoing issues that arise from trying to balance landscape enhancement with the need for productive practical agriculture. We also saw a restored dew pond. Dew ponds have been dated as far back as Neolithic times, and are a source of much debate as to how they traditionally filled up with water. Landscape archaeology suggests they were used for watering cattle and were lined with clay to hold the water. As we saw, they are always a popular haven for wildlife. There are number of such ponds in and around the North York Moors.

Dew Pond - South Downs NP, Farm Liaison Officers Meeting 2015 - copyright Roy McGhie, NYMNPA

We also visited Pepperscombe on the Wiston Estate. Here we were introduced to the Steyning Downland Scheme which aims to reconnect people, particularly children, with the countryside around them. The Scheme partly came about because of increased visitor pressure on the South Downs Way, which runs through many farms and fields, as well as mountain biking and dog walking issues. Today there are Trustees and a steering group to represent the needs of the local community, which has seen a designated area created for bikers, the establishment of a team of local volunteers to monitor the plant life, and the opportunity for school children to enjoy creative educational days out on site.

Cattle are used to graze the scrub. The photo below shows the effect just a small number

Conservation grazing - South Downs NP, Farm Liaison Officers Meeting 2015 - copyright Roy McGhie, NYMNPA

of cattle can have. The area on the left in the foreground was grazed by just six Dexter cattle for only 3 weeks. The area on the right in the background is a new area of scrub the cattle have just moved in to. The difference is remarkable. Dexter cattle are the smallest of all European cattle breeds, and can be particularly suited to conservation grazing with public access because the animals are less intimidating to members of public than larger breeds.

South Downs landscape - South Downs NP, Farm Liaison Officers Meeting 2015 - copyright Roy McGhie, NYMNPA

On the second day, we were back in doors talking through shared subjects such as funding opportunities under Rural Development Programmes and transition from the current national agri-environment schemes (Environmental Stewardship) to the new Countryside Stewardship scheme. Overall the conference proved to be very informative, and I think we all took away knowledge that will help us with our work with land managers to enhance the qualities of each of our wonderful National Parks.

A to Z – a collection of Cs

C

CANON ATKINSON – a literary celebrity

John Christopher Atkinson (1814–1900) was an author and antiquarian. He was born in Essex, and ordained a priest in 1842. Progressing from a curacy in Scarborough, he first became domestic chaplain to the 7th Viscount Downe in 1847 before in the same year being made Vicar of Danby. So Atkinson  relocated to this isolated Parish in the Cleveland Hills.

Danby Parish and the surrounding area offered a new panorama to a gentleman antiquarian. Atkinson explored the history and natural history of his parish and acquired a unique knowledge of local legends and contemporary customs using primary sources i.e. his parishioners and the landscape around him. He produced studies on local dialects and, in 1872 he published the first volume of ‘The History of Cleveland, Ancient and Modern’. He went on to write and edit a number of books and was recognised in his lifetime with an honorary degree from the University of Durham. By far his best-known work was a collection of local legends, traditions and reflections on modern rural life which he published in 1891, with the title ‘Forty Years in a Moorland Parish: reminiscences and researches in Danby in Cleveland’.

Atkinson died at the Vicarage in Danby, on 31 March 1900, and is buried at St Hilda’s Church in Danby Dale. He was married three times and fathered thirteen children, in between his writing.

CLAPPER BRIDGES

Clapper bridges are rare in the North York Moors and where they do survive they are often hard to find due to their simple functional appearance which is often hidden by a modern highway road obscuring their unique construction.

Clapper bridge - copyright NYMNPA

Underside of a clapper bridge - copyright NYMNPAThey are one of the earliest known bridge designs – the design is found across the world. Clapper bridges were built with long, thin slabs of stone to make a beam-type deck and with large rocks or piles of stones for piers. Some clapper bridges were wide enough to accommodate a cart, while others were designed for pedestrians or horse riders only, with carts crossing at a ford alongside the bridge. The word “clapper” could derive from an Anglo-Saxon word – cleaca – meaning “bridging the stepping stones”, but it is also suggested that the word derives from the Medieval Latin – claperius – meaning “a pile of stones”.

Clapper bridges would have once have been common in Britain but over time these bridges began to fall into disuse as more substantial methods of bridge construction were needed and, undoubtedly, many clapper bridges were destroyed to make room for newer bridges.

Clapper bridges are most commonly found on upland areas in Britain. Elsewhere the importance of these bridges is recognised and protected through designation but as yetClapper bridge near Castleton - copyright NYMNPA there are no listed clapper bridges in the North York Moors. We’re keen to make sure that all surviving bridges in the North York Moors are at least recorded; please let us know if you come across one. Graham, our Senior Archaeological Conservation Officer, found this one near Castleton while out walking. An application has been made to Historic England to help secure its survival.

CLEVELAND PRACTICE

The Cleveland Practice of blast-furnace technology for iron-making relates to a move away from large stone furnace structures towards larger, less enduring iron-clad construction. The zenith of this practice was reached in the Cleveland area from the mid-1860s, when for about 10 years the region took a world lead in blast-furnace practice. By 1875, the Cleveland area was producing 32% of the national output making it the greatest single iron-making district in the world.

The Cleveland Practice was distinctive, with the ironstone always first roasted in a calcining kiln, close to the blast-furnaces, to which it would be transferred whilst still hot. The blast-furnaces took the form of tall cylinders, rising to a height of 80 feet, with an average capacity of 30,000 cubic feet. Furnaces were worked with closed top systems to avoid heat loss, with multiple hot-blast blowing engines used at higher speed / pressure and with powerful machinery to move supplies to the kiln tops more efficiently. This technique was developed specifically to smelt large quantities of relatively low grade ironstone as cheaply as possible and, to achieve this, reliance was placed on improving energy efficiency – the height of the furnace stack was increased in order to utilize the heat generated at the base of the furnace to heat the materials being charged in at the top. The disadvantage of poor quality Cleveland ironstone (generally with a purity of only 26-33%) was offset by the huge quantities that were available locally and the high quality coke from the Durham coalfields to smelt it.

The transition from the old style blast furnaces to the new ‘Cleveland Practice’ style can be seen between the sites of the Beckhole and the Grosmont Ironworks in the North York Moors. The low quality ironstone from the Moors was contributing to the total at this stage but our most important period was pre-1850; once the Eston Mines came on-stream in the 1850s they were producing enormous quantities of (relatively poor-grade) ironstone which invigorated the rise of Teesside at the end of the 19th century.

COMMUNITIES…in general

Unlike in many other National Parks across the world, National Parks in the UK have human populations. People continue to shape the landscape, conserve their cultural heritage and maintain their natural environment. The nature of the North York Moors landscape means we have a pattern of dispersed settlements and individual farmsteads making up the communities in our National Park. The majority of communities are small fairly isolated settlements with a limited range of services and facilities. Given the chance however communities work hard to make the most out of what is practical and to provide essential services as well as retaining and promoting a strong proactive sense of community and identity. The National Park Authority’s planning policies within our Local Development Framework allow for some limited development opportunities including the creation of new facilities, housing and employment.  We have a long track record of working with communities whether that’s information exchange through regular Parish Forum meetings or the provision of funding support for community ideas through our Community Grant and the recent North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme.  See also below.

COASTAL COMMUNITIES…in particular

The North York Moors National Park has 26-miles of coastline with towering cliffs and rocky shores, steep wooded valleys, sheltered bays and sandy beaches. To showcase this fantastic coastline and the natural, fishing, artistic and culinary heritage of the coastal villages such as Robin Hood’s Bay, Staithes and Runswick Bay, we’ve secured £455,000 from the PrintCoastal Communities Fund (CCF) to deliver the ‘Sea Life, See Life’ initiative from now until the end of December 2016. The Fund aims to encourage the economic development of UK coastal communities, and through this project we’re looking to attract new visitors who want to do something different, and to encourage visitors to stay longer and spend more.

Fishing coble at Staithes - copyright Brian Nicholson, NYMNPA

It’s a partnership project, with the National Park Authority working with local businesses and communities to define what really makes this area special and different. Workshops and skills training will set up local businesses and communities to be ready to guide visitors to the high quality experiences available and encourage them to support local supply chains to strengthen and sustain the North York Moors’ economy. The project includes small-scale infrastructure projects such as interpretation, heritage restoration works, village improvements, and new public artwork to be delivered alongside a strong public relations and social-media led campaign. There’s also support for new events, festivals and activities, including an interactive trail in Staithes to capitalise on CBeebies’ Old Jack’s Boat, which is filmed in the village.

COMMON COTTON GRASS Eriophorum angustifolium

Patches of cotton grass – featherlike white smidgens of fluff – flutter in the early summer across the wetter areas of moorland .

Cotton Grass - copyright NYMNPA

Cotton grass is a sedge, not actually a grass. A sedge is a grass/rush like plant with triangular solid stems and unassuming flowers which usually grow on wet ground.

CONNECTIVITY

We do go on a bit about Habitat Connectivity on our Blog. That’s because it’s the fundamental concept articulated by Sir John Lawton in his Making Space for Nature review in 2010 which is guiding natural environment conservation efforts across the country. In the North York Moors we’re putting connectivity principles into practice working at a local scale.

Slide 1

BETTER ecologically valuable habitat sites through improving condition

Slide 2

BIGGER ecologically valuable habitat sites through expansion and bufferingSlide 3jpg

MORE ecologically valuable habitat sites through creation and enhancement

Slide 4

BETTER CONNECTED ecologically valuable habitats through creation/enhancement of corridors and stepping stones

Slide 5

The result is a connected landscape making it easier for species to move through

Slide 6

CROSSES

The remains of stone crosses can be found across the moorland area of the North York Moors. They are such a particular feature of the area that the North York Moors National Park took Young Ralph’s Cross to be its emblem.

The survival of original moorland crosses is very variable – some only comprise the base or socket stones, whilst others appear more complete, although the latter may be due to modern repairs or replacement – such as Ainhowe Cross on Spaunton Moor which was replaced in the 19th century. There are different styles of cross-heads – such as wheelheads (White Cross and Steeple Cross) and the simple upright cross shafts with projecting arms (such as Young and Old Ralph, Mauley and Malo crosses) – the latter make up the majority of the surviving examples.

Old Ralph Cross - copyright Tammy Andrews, NYMNPA

In the North York Moors the most relevant reasons for the original crosses seems to be as way-markers, boundary markers and memorials – potentially all three at once. For a Christian traveller coming across a symbol and reminder of Christianity whilst crossing the desolate moorland must have given hope and succour. Crosses may also have been erected by landowners to mark boundaries and as a good deed, or pre-existing crosses used as a local landmark to help define a boundary. The most famous memorial cross on the Moors is also meant to be the earliest – Lilla’s Cross – which is said to mark the burial site of the servant who sacrificed his own life to save that of his King, Edwin of Northumbria, in the 7th century AD. Although the surviving roughly cut maltese cross is actually dated approximately to the 10th century AD.

Lilla Cross - copyright Mike Kipling for NYMNPA

After the Protestant Reformation in England, the cross came to be seen by some as a symbol of superstition and this led to the slighting and destruction of individual moorland crosses. This may help to explain – in addition to weathering and deterioration over hundreds of years – why so many crosses today are missing their upper shafts and cross arms.

A new stone cross was erected in Rosedale in 2000 to mark the Millennium, continuing a cultural tradition of the local area.Millennium Cross, Rosedale - copyright Jay Marrison, NYMNPA

Previously on the North York Moors A to Z … A, B

LEADER funding confirmation

Amy Thomas – North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme Manager

After months of preparation and much anticipation, a couple of weeks ago we heard the news we had been waiting for – Defra confirmed that our bid for a new LEADER Programme in the North York Moors, Coast and Hills area has been successful!

 By Mike KiplingWe have been allocated just over £2.3 million to support projects and activities over the next six years which will deliver positive benefits to the local economy particularly through the creation of employment opportunities and the development of local business. We received the third highest funding allocation in England, and with 80 Programmes approved in total across the country, this was a fantastic outcome for us.

LEADER Programme priorities for this round are:

  • Farm Productivity
  • Micro and Small Enterprise and Farm Diversification
  • Rural Tourism
  • Rural Services
  • Culture and Heritage
  • Forestry Productivity

Hovingham Market by Chris J ParkerThe Programme is due to be officially launched in summer 2015 and we will be looking for projects to come forward under the six priorities from this point. Details on eligibility, criteria and how to apply for each round of funding will be on our website.

The LEADER Executive Group (individuals from the local area representing local communities, the business sector, tourism, forestry and agriculture) will oversee all grant applications and make decisions about how best to allocate the funding. The Group will also design and implement a number of larger scale sector specific support projects which were identified during the consultation process last year.

Many thanks to all our partners and members of the Steering Group whose commitment to the Programme and the area helped us achieve this welcome outcome. 

View of Saltburn by Mike NicholasNow we’re looking forward to delivering the Programme…

To keep up to date with the Programme as it develops and to receive news of upcoming opportunities – you might want to join our Local Action Group (LAG) – so please contact us. 

Map

Last year’s top 5 posts

Iron oxide running down walls inside abandoned mine - NYMNPA

1. Hangover from the past

Update posted by Emily just last week with a suggested Hangover cure

 

 

 

Philip Wilkinson, Westerdale - Ami Walker2. A week in the life of a Land Manager Adviser        

 

 

 

3. Peculiarity of Character: part 1 and part 2

11c 11a11b

In addition to the characterful structures mentioned previously – here are three photos of the faces of a stone near to Worm Sike Rigg – it’s inscribed to “G. BAKER AGED 68 YEARS WHO WAS LOST ON THE 5 OF DECEM 1878 AND WAS FOUND HERE ON THE 26 OF JANUARY 1879”. The supposition is G Baker died of exposure out on the moors and the stone was erected as a memorial to the man and the tragic event.

Heptageniid - Emily Collins

4. River Monsters

Emily is carrying on Sam’s good work – this is a photograph she’s taken of a Heptageniid down the end of a microscope.

 

Hovingham Market - Chris J Parker

 

5. 129 Projects in 129 Pictures

Following on from the previous North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme which finished in 2013, we submitted a bid to Defra in September 2014 for a new LEADER Programme which would run from 2015 to 2021.

We’re just waiting to hear whether we have been successful, and we’ll share any news as soon as possible!

If we are successful, the new LEADER Programme will be looking for projects that generate jobs and support the local economy under the following six priority areas:

  • Increasing Farm Productivity
  • Micro and Small Enterprise and Farm Diversification
  • Rural Tourism
  • Rural Services
  • Cultural and Heritage Activity
  • Increasing Forestry Productivity

In the meantime we are working out how to approach these priorities and what we would like to fund over the next six years so we’ll be ready to go as soon as we find out if this area’s LEADER Programme is approved.  Keep in touch through our website, follow us on Twitter  and keep an eye on this Blog.    

Winter landscape - Lower Bilsdale - NYMNPAAnd if you’re wondering whether last year’s blatant attempt to get someone from Iceland to view our Blog succeeded – unfortunately not. But we won’t give up – við hlökkum til annars árs varðveislu í North York Moors þjóðgarðurinn og við munum tryggja að láta þig vita hvað við erum að gera í gegnum bloggið okkar.

A Toast to the Coast

John Beech – Coastal Project Officer

Turning plans into action

The eastern edge of the North York Moors National Park ends abruptly as it cascades over the cliffs onto beaches and shoreline and into the North Sea. As spectacular as any coastal landscape in the UK, our local coastline is a real gem.

Old harbour at Saltwick Bay used by vessels to transport materials for the Alum industry - John Beech

Careful planning is needed to look after our marvellous natural asset. As the local Coastal Projects Officer, I’ve spent the last few months working on a new coastal Management Plan that, if followed, should make sure our share of national treasure is looked after into the future.

HC boundary marker at Upgang, Whitby JBThe coastline between Boulby and Cloughton is not only in the North York Moors National Park but it also makes up part of the North Yorkshire and Cleveland Heritage Coast, one of 45 Heritage Coasts in England and Wales. These undeveloped scenic coastlines were defined in the 1970s by the (now extinct) Countryside Commission and they’re just as worthy of the special protection and recognition now as then. The Management Plan covers the whole North Yorkshire and Cleveland Heritage Coast (from Saltburn down to Scalby Mills).

Working on the new Plan has taken some time. We ran a public consultation over the summer to gauge people’s views on how to care for the coast into the future. Many of the responses chimed with what we were thinking but new issues and ideas were also raised regarding conservation, recreation, beach and water quality and coastal communities both by local people and national organisations – and these all needed considering and incorporating.

Cattersty Beach, Skinningrove - John Beech

The new Management Plan, which is due to be published in early 2015, will promote key principles to guide agencies and land managers and local communities working together as we move into the 2015 – 2020 period. To get an idea of what kind of thing we’re working towards – our previous Management Plan 2009 – 2014 is available on the North Yorkshire and Cleveland Coastal Forum website.

Our ongoing Coastal Forum is an active collection of people and organisations who have a vested interest and shared vision in the safeguarding and enhancement of a sustainable Heritage Coast. Back in September we organised our 12th annual Coastal Forum partnership conference. We had over 60 people attend to hear guest speakers from the Marine Management Organisation, Whitby Fishing School, Parkol Marine (shipbuilders), Whitby Whale Watching, Whitby & District Tourism Association and East Barnby Outdoor Centre. Due to the all-day sea fret (fog) we couldn’t get out to sea to look for whales in the afternoon but we did have an informative boat trip up and down Coastal Forum - a foggy day in Whitby Town the River Esk (no whales) and had a chance for a close up look at the Whitby harbour walls – impressive listed structures that were originally built in the 15th century.

If you’re interested in joining the Forum – get in touch.

Disused Alum Quarrries at Boulby - John BeechBack to the day to day stuff

In between developing and writing the new Plan, I’ve been working closely with the Environment Agency to improve the rivers and watercourses that run into the sea along the coast. In 2015, our bathing beaches at Staithes, Runswick, Sandsend and Robin Hood’s Bay will be subject to increased scrutiny as the EU Bathing Water Directive raises the bar on water quality. By working in the wider catchments now, addressing land management, we hope to give the beaches a better chance of reaching these new stricter guideline standards. So working with land managers we’ve been assisting with the fencing off of watercourses (and providing in field water sources) and planting beck side trees where there had been access points for cattle and breaks in the woodland cover. As well as the trees buffering the watercourses, the fencing prevents the livestock standing in the water and doing what comes naturally after a day’s grazing in the fields!

As well as addressing water quality issues this work also improves habitat connectivity by creating habitat corridors. We will also be back at farms in the Staithes Beck catchment in early 2015 to continue with some of the excellent work done last winter to promote habitat connectivity. We’ll be back planting hedges again at Roxby and Borrowby to provide these vital wildlife links between the coastal wooded gills there.

The Exmoor ponies on the coastal slope at Runswick Bay are currently off the undercliff for the winter. In the meantime our National Park Apprentices will set to and undertake some mechanical scrub control. Taking out the edges of the established scrub is part of the plan to encourage the seacliff grassland habitat to expand. The ponies have done a marvellous job over the summer tackling the scrub and will be back in the spring ready for some light grazing in 2015.Butterwort growing on cliffs at Beast Cliff Special Area of Conservation (SAC) - John Beech

The mixture of work that I do as the Coastal Project Officer is incredibly varied and thoroughly enjoyable and the opportunity to work in such a dynamic environment is something that I cherish every day.

People, Places and Projects

Amy Thomas – North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme Manager

After five years of work we’ve made it to the end of the 2008-2013 North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme.

For those of you that aren’t familiar with our fantastic LEADER Programme (shame on you) it’s been a tale of projects and people, places and the other dreaded ‘p’ – paperwork! Basically, the Programme provided funding for innovative and sustainable rural development projects under three themes: Basic Services, Village Renewal & Tourism, Conservation & Heritage.

With memories of the last Programme already beginning to fade, I thought this would be the ideal opportunity to share some of the highlights and at the same time to keep the idea of LEADER alive as we move rather quickly towards our next Programme.

Back in 2008 with five years stretching ahead of us, we started out on our LEADER adventure full of enthusiasm and high hopes. It has to be said that the end result was everything we’d hoped it would be and more. It’s been a journey which has not only had the pleasure and privilege in making a small contribution to so many projects and communities, but has provided me (and my colleagues I’m sure!) with enormous job satisfaction.

Over the years a huge number of people have been involved in the LEADER Programme delivering projects in their village or as a member of our Local Action Group and/or Executive Group.

The Executive Group have played a vital role making decisions on many aspects of the Programme. Many of the Executive were local volunteers who gave their time and skills freely, and acquitted themselves exceptionally well to the task at hand.

Esk Pearl Mussel VisitAlong with the hard work of assessing and approving project applications, the Executive got stuck in to days negotiating the muddy banks of the River Esk to see some of the work done by the Esk Pearl Mussel & Salmon Recovery Project, trying their hand at a spot of dowsing with the Mulgrave Community Research Project, and inspecting the orchards and production unit of Husthwaite’s now famous apple juice and cider. These visits brought individual projects to life and gave us all the chance to really see the positive contributions being made to local life through LEADER funding.

The projects we have been able to support have provided us with many great stories to share. Our first training project, the Yorkshire Moors Agricultural Apprenticeship Scheme (YMAAS) took on their first group of seven apprentices in 2009. Following the successful completion of their apprenticeships, all seven young people moved on to further education or employment. YMAAS has continued and are now beginning to work with their third set of apprentices, and are frequently held up nationally as a model of good practice.YMAAS

More than 20 communities were supported by the LEADER funded Community Access Project and Martyn Williams (the Project Officer) to create or improve footpaths around their villages. These new circular or linear routes are providing safe new routes to school for children, creating local visitor amenities and have meant the upgrading of a number of footpaths to multi-user routes at some of the National Park’s most popular locations.  

Following the identification of a new circular route around Coxwold, residents rolled up their sleeves and got stuck in, helping with everything from installing gates to improving surfacing.Community Access Project in Coxwold

Many of the smallest projects assisted (usually through the LEADER funded Small Scale Enhancement Schemes) have been located in some of the most beautiful parts of our area and have given us an insight into some fascinating hidden gems. To name just a few, the conservation work at Castle Howard’s Exclamation Gates, at Howsham Mill and at Handale Abbey, along with the new interpretation panels at Egton Mortuary Chapel and Warren Moor Mine, Kildale are all well worth a visit.Egton Mortuary Chapel

The people who made each project happen are often the lynch pin within communities and so were crucial to the Programme. Without them we would never have been able to have achieved all we have. The people behind the projects never failed to amaze me with their dedication and commitment. I’ve seen them do everything from making tea and scones for fundraising to digging up concrete village hall floors. The same people have also been the ones filling in the forms and I’m sure the paperwork has been tedious but it is unfortunately always an essential part of funding. However despite the difficulties and the highs and lows that some projects go through, I’d like to think that the pride of opening the doors of their newly refurbished village hall, selling their first bottle of apple juice or seeing their village come together to celebrate centuries of traditions reminded them of why they got involved, and in doing so how they became a part of the local LEADER story. Gilling East VH Opening

So…the five years have flown by in the blink of an eye and some tremendous projects have emerged, but instead of mourning the end of our LEADER Programme, I’d much rather see this as an opportunity to embark on our next exciting chapter. We’re going to take all we’ve learnt and use this to build our next Programme. Although it is likely to be fundamentally different in terms of the projects we’ll be able to support, it will still hold at its core the traditional LEADER principles of co-operation, networking and innovation achieved through bottom up local development.

We shall relish the challenge of developing our new Programme and the more people who get involved, the better the end result will undoubtedly be! If this all sounds like something you’d like to know more about or would like to know how you can get involved, please get in touch 

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We will apply to Defra in September to have a new LEADER Programme for our area and will hear by the end of the year if we have been successful.

129 Projects in 129 Pictures

Clair Shields – Planning Officer (Building Conservation) and Monument Management Scheme Volunteer Coordinator – previously LEADER Small Scale Enhancements Co-ordinator

Using LEADER money, the North York Moors Small Scale Enhancements Scheme (January 2010 – December 2013) was a relatively small funding stream to help communities carry out enhancement work and conserve assests in their local village and parish. Projects had to fit with one or more of these three LEADER themes:

  • Conservation & Heritage
  • Village Renewal & Development
  • Access to Basic Services

The concept behind the Small Scale Enhancements (SSE) Scheme was that all projects should be generated by the local community, because local people are best placed to determine what’s of value in their area. The National Park Authority bankrolled the projects until the money could be claimed back from the LEADER fund which meant that local communities didn’t have to miss out if they couldn’t find their own temporary funding.

A few key facts

  • 129 projects supported over 4 years
  • 74% of projects fell within the cultural heritage theme
  • 14% of projects fell within the village enhancement theme
  • 12% of projects fell within the access to basic services theme
  • £323,586 of funding provided to 90 communities
  • Additional £30,000 of funding generated through match funding
  • Average cost per project amounted to £2,734

Below are 129 (very small) pictures – each one illustrating one of the 129 small scale projects. Hopefully the pictures give you some impression of the array of enhancements realised through the North York Moors SSE.

HB900 and Vicar's Walk, Hutton Buscel - celebrating 900 years of the Church + tree work 'Heather Hopper' for Esk Moors Active - provision of lift on community bus Lastingham Village Railings - renewal of traditional stone posts and timber railings

 

Lythe Village Hall - outdoor seating equipment Wass Environment Day - weekend public event celebrating the local environment Old St Stephen's Chuch, Fylingdales - noticeboards, pamphlets, posts and website

 

 

 

Shandy Hall Gate, Coxwold - reinstatement of gates and rebuilding of drystone wall Egton Mortuary Chapel - provision of information board Gillamoor Village Enhancements - restoration of traditional name signs + tablet at Surprise View

 

 

 

Hartoft Horse Trough - repair of double horse troughs 'A Sign in the Right Direction' Project - refurbishment of 8 traditional highways signs Drovers' Road Play - creation of play based on local heritage

 

 

 

Thornton le Dale Village Projects - notice board, directional signs and restoration of stocks. Alms Houses photo by Peter Smith. Heritage Cycle Routes - creation of cycle route linking heritage and local villages in the south of the North York Moors Kilburn Village Institute - upgrading heating system. Photo © Gordon Hatto.

 

 

 

Coxwold Village Enhancements Art for Sustainability - art classes around sense of place Chop Yat Iron Forge Festival, Chop Gate - traditional events and demonstrations

 

 

 

Fylingthorpe Methodist Chapel - setting up luncheon club for elderly residents Ravenscar Barrows - geophysical survey of ancient barrow site Sinnington Local History Group - I.T. equipment for village archive

 

 

 

Fylingdales Local History Group's 'Archive Open Door Project' - archiving historical documents Rosedale History Society - display equipment
Rosedale Railway 150 - website and leaflet to celebrate 150 anniversary

 

 

Farndale Band Room - provision of new doors Lastingham War Memorial - restoration Old Byland Church - restoration of drystone walls and mediaeval tiles

 

 

 

Lealholm Church Pews - seat cushions Roxby Old Manor Site - consolidation of ruins Aislaby Name Signs - provision of traditional looking signage

 

 

 

Rosedale and Thorgill Name Plates - provision of traditional looking signage Abbeyfield Esk Moor, Castleton - projector and sound equipment for facilities for the elderly Ampleforth Water Pump - repair of street water pump

 

 

 

 

Appleton le Moors Church Displays - permanent display in Church Beggars Bridge, Glaisdale - interpretation panel Castleton Play Area - new access gate

 

 

 

Chop Gate History Project - celebrating the last 60 years of Bilsdale Commondale Village Hall - new boundary fencing and disabled access Goathland Village Improvements - restoration of heritage signage and old stone trough

 

 

 

Ha Ha Bridge, Thornton le Dale - restoration of listed bridge Hackness Pinfold - restoration Hackness, Suffield, Broxa Name Signs - traditional looking name signs

 

 

 

Hinderwell Cemetery - restoration of iron railings Hutton Buscel Gate Piers - restoration of listed pillars and reinstatement of gates Hutton le Hole War Memorial - renovation

 

 

 

 

Hutton le Hole Wildflower Area - creation of wild flower meadow behind Church Ingleby and Battersby Junction Name Signs - traditional looking new name signs Ingleby Cross and Arncliffe Name Signs - new village name signs

 

 

 

Jugger Howe Nature Trail - boardwalk materials for new nature trail Lastingham Beck Enhancement Lockton Village Improvements - restoration of village well and provision of tree seat

 

 

 

Lythe War Memorial - cleaning and re-etching NYM Honeybee Conservation Project - hives for nucleus colonies Osmotherley Pinfold - repair

 

 

 

Oswaldkirk Telephone Kiosk - restoration Peacock Row Cobbling, Robin Hood's Bay - pavement works Pinchinthorpe Hall - moat and garden restoration

 

 

 

 

Plum Tree House, Borrowby - restoration of historic trods River Esk Monitoring - training local anglers to monitor invertebrates Rosedale Church Conservation Area - creation of grassland conservation area in churchyard

 

 

 

Rosedale East Pond - restoration Seggymire Community Access - restoration of historic route along Old Monks Trod Sinnington Village Maypole - restoration of village maypole

 

 

 

Sneaton War Memorial - cleaning Spaunton Village Projects - retoration of listed Victoria cross and village pinfold St Hilda's Church, Chop Gate - notice board and seat

 

 

 

St Hilda's Old School, Hinderwell - new energy efficient lighting St John's, Fangdale Beck - restoration of war memorial and new gate Staithes Harbour Store - improvements

 

 

 

 

Tallest Man in the World Musical - creation of musical play telling local story by Osmotherley and Swainby Primary Schools Teaching Trees - coordination of woodland classess for local schools The Hulleys, Cloughton - topographic and geophysical surveys of prehistoric site

 

 

 

Thimbleby Sports Field - provision of a generator Thirlby Village Improvements - railings for Village Hall, traditional name sign, I.T equipment Underhill Flags, Robin Hood's Bay - repairs to section of historic stone flag footpath

 

 

 

Victorian Geology Experience - display materials and costumes Warren Moor Panel - on site interpretation of the 19th century Ironstone Mine Bilsdale 100th Anniversary Show - contribution to celebrations

 

 

 

Hawnby and Laskill Telephone Boxes - reuse of old red telephone boxes as information hubs Hall Fields Walk, Great Ayton - improved access into woods Battersby Junction - opening up section of historic trod

 

 

 

 

Goathland Trods - restoration of historic stone trodsBygones of Bilsdale - 3 day exhibition and event to record memories
Hutton le Hole Village Hall - provision of screen for presentations. Photo © Pauline Eccle.

 

 

 

 

Robin Hood's Bay Museum - promotional signage and display lightingHutton Buscel Churchyard Project - woodland and wildlife education

 Robin Hood's Bay Museum - improvements to the Museum to gain museum accreditation. Photo © Mike Kirby.

 

 

 

Hinderwell War Memorial - renovation Battersby Junction Recreation Ground - contaminated land survey to enable community use Danby History Tree - educational history plate in tree stump

 

 

 

Hawnby Church Path - footpath works for improved and safer access to Church Levishan Wall - rebuilding of prominent drystone wall in Conservation Area Newton on Rawcliffe Village Hall - timber windows

 

 

 

Lastingham Notice Boards - provision of 2 new village notice boards Danby Village Hall - improving energy efficiency. Photo from solarwall.co.uk. St Thomas', Glaisdale - churchyard improvements + information board. Photo from Familysearch.com.

 

 

 

Doorways Project - local youth scheme to involve young people in their community Bridge over the River Esk - erection of bridge to open up circular routes Fryup Cricket Club - new pavilion and improvements to facilities

Byland Abbey and Oldstead Village Improvements - restoration of traditional name signs Appleton le Moors Village Hall Display - provision of display equipment St Michael's, Cold Kirby - heating and lighting improvements. Photo from Familysearch.org.

 

 

 

West Ayton Wildflowers Project - creation of a wild flower meadow

 

Flithers and Swill, Staithes - production of song reflecting local oral history Handale Abbey Gate - new gate for listed walled garden. Picture of local legend by pupil from St Josephs School, Loftus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lealholm Village Interpretation - village information board Kildale Village Boards - information board and two new noticeboards Hawsker Village Interpretation - village information board

 

 

 

Fylingdales Football Team - purchase of starter kit for newly formed local team Rosedale Abbey Pond - restoration Gillamoor Cricket Club - provision of cricket nets for playing field

 

NYM Riding Routes - promotion of 14 circular horse riding routes through the National Park Gateways - website development for access promotion Chop Gate and Carlton School Wildlife Areas - creation

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunnyside Trods, Fylingdales - restoration of historic trod Cosy Cottage Steps, Robin Hood's Bay - pavement works Laurel Cottage to Gallery Cottage, Robin Hood's Bay - pavement work

 

 

 

 

St John's, Pockley - restoration of old Victorian heating system Osmotherley Cobbles - restoration of cobbled area  Ride Yorkshire - creation and promotion of long distance horse ride routes

Ugglebarnby Village Improvements - renovation of traditional sign and trods Levisham Flag Pole - reinstatement of village flag pole
North Yorkshire and Cleveland Heritage Coast Forum Panels - six interpretation panels to help promote work of Forum

 

 

Staintondale and Ravenscar Local History Group - digitally recording their archive collections

 

 

 

 

Staithes Arts and Heritage Festival - equipment to display archivesIngleby Greenhow Name Signs - restoration

 

 

 

Newton on Rawcliffe Church Clock - restoration and repair Kildale Tomb Chests - repair of listed tombs in churchyard

 

 

Hawk and Owl Trust - interpretation for Fylingdales Moor

For more information see the full North York Moors SSE Review. Hopefully we will be able to access LEADER funding for the North York Moors and surrounding area again from 2015. In the meantime the National Park has its own Community Fund for small scale local projects.

 

Guess where – and you might even win a prize

Because we don’t want to stop celebrating the successes of the North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER Programme (2009 – 2013) – and we didn’t want to leave our Blog Followers out – click here for a Mystery Competition. You’ll need to be quick though because the closing date is 28 February 2014.

Update (15 March 2014)

Here are the Answers! Congratulations go to Paula Connelly who has won a copy of the fabulous local photography book from the Joe Cornish Gallery with five correct answers.

Thank you to everyone who took part.

 

 

Opportunities to shape a new LEADER Programme

Jo Collins – LEADER Programme Officer

You might know that the North York Moors, Coast and Hills LEADER* Programme (2008 – 2013) has now ended.  

However, we are lucky enough to have secured a small amount of additional funding from Defra to help us develop a new LEADER Programme, which if successful, would take effect from 2015.

This is an exciting prospect with the potential to create and build on opportunities for our area and for local people to get involved from the beginning. The first stage of the process is to talk to local residents, businesses, organisations and communities to find out what needs and opportunities are present, and identify those that LEADER may be able to help with. The more information we have the better as this will assist us to gain a clearer understanding of our area and the support LEADER could provide.

There are going to be four initial consultation sessions where you can share your thoughts and ideas with us:

  • Hovingham Village Hall, Tuesday 18 February from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm
  • Loftus Co-op Building, Thursday 20 February from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm
  • Burniston Village Hall, Tuesday 25 February from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm
  • Civic Centre, Northallerton, Tuesday 4 March from 6.30 pm to 8.30 pm

If you think you might like to be a part of this exciting opportunity we would be delighted to see you at a session. Please contact Jo Collins at leader@northyorkmoors.org.uk or on 01439 772700 to book your place.

If you can’t make it to any of the planned events you can still be involved – we would greatly appreciate any comments or ideas you may have for the local area. Please have a look at our online survey.

* LEADER is a European initiative for assisting rural communities to improve the quality of life and economic prosperity in their local area.